Scotland Yard: Force of Blast Killed Bhutto

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Mourners hold candles during a ceremony for Benazir Bhutto in Lahore, Pakistan. i

Pakistanis hold candles during a ceremony for Benazir Bhutto in Lahore, Pakistan, to mark the end of the 40-day mourning period for her on Thursday. Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images
Mourners hold candles during a ceremony for Benazir Bhutto in Lahore, Pakistan.

Pakistanis hold candles during a ceremony for Benazir Bhutto in Lahore, Pakistan, to mark the end of the 40-day mourning period for her on Thursday.

Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images

A delegate from Scotland Yard releases a report of its investigation into the assassination of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto on Friday. The findings echo those of the Pakistan government: that she was killed by the force of the suicide blast, not by a gunshot wound.

The report is unlikely to dampen speculation that the government was somehow involved in Bhutto's death.

U.K. Team Backs Govt. Account of Bhutto Death

Pakistan's opposition leader Benazir Bhutto was killed by a head injury she received from a suicide bomb blast and not by gunfire that preceded the explosion, investigators from Britain's Scotland Yard said Friday.

The conclusion, which backs the government's own probe into the assassination, has drawn skepticism from Bhutto's close aides, who suspect an official cover-up because Bhutto had accused political allies of President Pervez Musharraf of plotting to kill her.

The British report also said Bhutto was probably killed by a lone assassin, who fired shots and detonated explosives, and was not attacked by two people, as many Pakistanis had speculated.

"The only tenable cause for the rapidly fatal head injury in this case is that it occurred as the result of impact due to the effects of the bomb-blast," British government pathologist Nathaniel Cary said in the report.

Bhutto, a two-time prime minister, was killed when her motorcade was attacked on Dec. 27 as she campaigned for parliamentary elections. The elections had been scheduled for January, but were pushed back to Feb. 18 after her death.

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