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Inside the Serious Art of Black Comedic Film

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Inside the Serious Art of Black Comedic Film

Inside the Serious Art of Black Comedic Film

Inside the Serious Art of Black Comedic Film

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/18818290/18818267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The 2002 film, Barbershop, grossed over $75 million worldwide. Tracy Bennett/MGM Studios Inc. hide caption

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Tracy Bennett/MGM Studios Inc.

In the beginning, comedy was the only genre open to a black actor looking for work. Even today, it's the most common form of African-American entertainment found at movie theaters.

Our series on film continues with a look at what's funny — and not so funny — about African-American based cinema.

Joining NPR's Tony Cox are comedian Darryl Littleton; cultural historian Fred MacDonald; and Mark Reid, professor of film and media studies at the University of Florida.