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Political Influences Trouble Top Scientists

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Political Influences Trouble Top Scientists

Science

Political Influences Trouble Top Scientists

Political Influences Trouble Top Scientists

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/19085881/19085879" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The Union of Concerned Scientists issued a statement Thursday calling for the next administration and Congress to ensure that federal scientists can publicly communicate findings, publish work, disclose misrepresentation, censorship or other abuses, and have their technical work evaluated by peers.

In a special live broadcast from Boston, Mass. — site of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting — guests discuss how to strengthen the integrity of science and the federal government.

Guests:

Rosina Bierbaum, former acting director and former associate director for Environment, Office of Science and Technology Policy; professor and dean, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan

David Goldston, former chief of staff, House Committee on Science; visiting lecturer, Center for Environment, Harvard University

Francesca Grifo, senior scientist; director of the Scientific Integrity Program, Union of Concerned Scientists

James McCarthy, president elect, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); co-chair, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group II for the Third IPCC Assessment; professor of biological oceanography, Harvard University