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Acoustics Update

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Acoustics Update

Acoustics Update

Acoustics Update

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1914723/1914724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Clapping hands at the steps of a Mayan pyramid produces echoes that sound like the call of a forest bird, the quetzal. At a meeting this week in New York, researchers presented new evidence that the Maya intentionally coded the sound of their sacred bird into the pyramid's architecture. In this hour — from archaeological acoustics to how whales hear and how infants acquire language.

Guests:

Patricia Kuhl
*Co-author of The Scientist in the Crib: Minds, Brains and How Children Learn
*Co-director, Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences
*Professor of speech and hearing sciences, and William P. and Ruth Gerberding University Professor, at the University of Washington

Darlene Ketten
*Senior scientist, biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, Mass.

David Lubman
*President, David Lubman and Associates in Westminster, Calif.