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Oscar Ballot Counters Hide Away to Tally Winners

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Oscar Ballot Counters Hide Away to Tally Winners

Oscar Ballot Counters Hide Away to Tally Winners

Oscar Ballot Counters Hide Away to Tally Winners

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/19174561/19174532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Every year, the week of the Oscars, Brad Oltmanns and Rick Rosas, partners at PricewaterhouseCoopers, and about 12 counters go to an undisclosed location in Southern California and hand count all 6,000 ballots. It takes the team about three days to determine the Academy Award winners.

Michele Norris talks with Oltmanns and Rosas before they go into hiding.

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