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Fewer Salty Snacks Linked to Fewer Sips of Soda

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Fewer Salty Snacks Linked to Fewer Sips of Soda

Children's Health

Fewer Salty Snacks Linked to Fewer Sips of Soda

Fewer Salty Snacks Linked to Fewer Sips of Soda

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A new study in the journal Hypertension finds that a modest cut in salt intake is linked to less soda drinking. Researchers say cutting back on snacks and soda could have lots of health benefits later in life — from lower blood pressure to reduced risk of obesity.

INSKEEP: Now, if you have questions for the experts on how your child can build self-discipline, email them to us through our Website, NPR.org/yourhealth. Next week we'll post answers to some of those questions and look a preschool program specifically designed to teach four year olds executive function skills. One final note on your kids, if you want them to drink less sweet soda, think about getting them to cut back on salty snacks.

A new study out of Britain followed more than 1500 kids aged 4 to 18, followed them for a week and documented what they ate and drank. The researchers found the kids who loaded up on salty foods and got thirsty often reached for a soft drink to quench their thirst.

But the researchers also found that even a modest cut in salt intake, just 10 or 20 percent was linked to less soda consumption. The study in the journal, Hypertension - that's one of the best journal names there have ever been, Hypertension - says cutting back on snacks and soda could have lots of health benefits later in life from lower blood pressure to reduced risk of obesity.

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STEVE INSKEEP: It's Morning Edition from NPR News.

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