Commentary: Deep Throat, Please Come Forward It's been 32 years since political operatives broke into a Democratic Party campaign office at the Watergate building -- a relatively small crime that eventually led to President Richard Nixon's resignation. But the true identity of Deep Throat, the source who leaked crucial details about the White House cover-up to reporters at The Washington Post, has never been revealed. Television critic Peter Mehlman calls for the legendary whistleblower to reveal himself.
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Commentary: Deep Throat, Please Come Forward

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Commentary: Deep Throat, Please Come Forward

Commentary: Deep Throat, Please Come Forward

Commentary: Deep Throat, Please Come Forward

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1962157/1962158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It's been 32 years since political operatives broke into a Democratic Party campaign office at the Watergate building — a relatively small crime that eventually led to President Richard Nixon's resignation. But the true identity of Deep Throat, the source who leaked crucial details about the White House cover-up to reporters at The Washington Post, has never been revealed. Television critic Peter Mehlman calls for the legendary whistleblower to reveal himself.

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