Jesse's Story: Beyond Myself Jesse Jean grew up without parents in inner-city Washington, D.C., and seemed destined to slip through the cracks. But then Jean met two mentors who put him on a very different path -- an elite boarding school in Connecticut. Independent radio producer Katie Davis first profiled Jean in May 2002, and has a follow-up.
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Jesse's Story: Beyond Myself

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Jesse's Story: Beyond Myself

Jesse's Story: Beyond Myself

At-Risk Teen First Profiled in 2002 Graduates High School

Jesse's Story: Beyond Myself

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1967655/1967837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jesse Jean as a senior at Hyde School in Woodstock, Conn. Courtesy Hyde School hide caption

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Courtesy Hyde School

Jean was a star player on the Hyde School basketball team. Courtesy Hyde School hide caption

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Courtesy Hyde School

Jesse Jean grew up without parents in inner-city Washington, D.C., and seemed destined to slip through the cracks. At age 16, a sophomore in high school, he was a failing student in danger of dropping out.

But then Jean met two mentors in a neighborhood tutoring center, and they put him on a very different path. They arranged a scholarship at Hyde School, an elite prep school in rural Woodstock, Conn.

Heard May 28, 2002 on All Things Considered:
Jesse's Story: Turning the Corner

Independent radio producer Katie Davis has known Jean for years — they lived in the same neighborhood, and Davis had watched him grow into a talented athlete with a quick mind and a bright, engaging smile.

Davis first profiled Jean for NPR's All Things Considered in May 2002, after his first year at boarding school. Back then, Jean hated the place and considered it a prison. The class work was harder than anything he'd ever had before.

Still, returning home to his old neighborhood was a bleak prospect. He was surrounded by failing schools, drug dealers and violence. So Jean hunkered down and mapped a strategy to make it through the rigorous school, by keeping to himself and focusing on himself — as Davis describes it, a bunker mentality.

Now, in the summer of 2004, Davis has a second portrait of Jean. She finds Jean actually embracing the academic and behavioral standards of the school — in fact, he's emerged a school leader.

Other kids at the school look up to him, and he likes to show the way with a quiet leadership style. When he returns to his old neighborhood, he talks to friends about turning away from dead-end lifestyles.

And there's a happy ending to this story — or at least, a happy beginning: Jean graduated from Hyde School on May 30, 2004.