Court Rules on Privacy of Personal Identity The Supreme Court rules that people do not have a constitutional right to refuse to tell police their names. The justices rejected, by a 5-4 vote, the argument that forcing people to give their names violates protections against unreasonable searches and self-incrimination. In the majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy said giving one's name is "insignificant in the scheme of things." NPR's Nina Totenberg reports.
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Court Rules on Privacy of Personal Identity

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Court Rules on Privacy of Personal Identity

Court Rules on Privacy of Personal Identity

Court Rules on Privacy of Personal Identity

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1967746/1967747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Supreme Court rules that people do not have a constitutional right to refuse to tell police their names. The justices rejected, by a 5-4 vote, the argument that forcing people to give their names violates protections against unreasonable searches and self-incrimination. In the majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy said giving one's name is "insignificant in the scheme of things." NPR's Nina Totenberg reports.