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Police and Personal Identity

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Police and Personal Identity

Police and Personal Identity

Police and Personal Identity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1972033/1972034" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Refusing to give your name to a police officer could get you arrested. That's what the Supreme Court ruled this week. Privacy advocates say the ruling violates constitutional rights. Law enforcement officials say its essential to good police work.

Guests:

Bill Johnson
*Executive director and legal counsel of the National Association of Police Organizations (NAPO)
*Filed amicus brief in the case — Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of the State of Nevada

Marc Rotenberg
*President, Electronic Privacy Information Center
*Filed amicus brief in the case — Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of the State of Nevada

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