Remembering The Satirical Side Of David Frost Armed with a portable tape recorder in 1965, NPR's Art Silverman interviewed broadcaster David Frost, who died over the weekend at age 74. At the time, Frost was host of the NBC TV program "That Was the Week That Was." (03:28)
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Remembering The Satirical Side Of David Frost

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Remembering The Satirical Side Of David Frost

Remembering The Satirical Side Of David Frost

Remembering The Satirical Side Of David Frost

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Armed with a portable tape recorder in 1965, NPR's Art Silverman interviewed broadcaster David Frost, who died over the weekend at age 74. At the time, Frost was host of the NBC TV program "That Was the Week That Was." (03:28)

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The death of British broadcaster David Frost over the weekend brought back memories of his interviews with famous people. Frost was known especially for his series of interviews with former President Richard Nixon. Most recently, he hosted a news and interview program on Al-Jazeera English. But for NPR's Art Silverman, before there was the serious side of Frost, there was a satirical one.

ART SILVERMAN, BYLINE: It was 1964; I was a high school student in New Jersey. Into the sitcom world of TV came a smart and clever show featuring David Frost. It was called "That Was the Week That Was."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS")

SILVERMAN: It had begun in the U.K; now, it was here, an anomaly on American television. To say I was a fan would be an understatement. I recorded all the shows - the sound, that is; home video was still years away. And some weeks, I'd take the bus into Manhattan to see the show in person in its NBC studios.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS")

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

SILVERMAN: After its up-to-the-minute headlines were sung, Frost and others would make incisive and funny jokes about political figures and other newsmakers.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS")

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

SILVERMAN: It's obvious here that David Frost's long entanglement with Richard Nixon predated his sit-down with the disgraced ex-president. It even predated the Nixon presidency.

But "That Was The Week That Was" didn't last long. It just didn't take with the American audience, and it was canceled in spring of 1965. I was there for the last show. With my little, unreliable, portable tape recorder, I went up to David Frost and poked a microphone his way. Nervously, I upcut my own question.

(SOUNDBITE OF 1965 RECORDING)

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS")

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

SILVERMAN: Well, personally, I hate goodbyes, too. I'll just say that was David Frost, that was. He died Saturday at age 74.

Art Silverman, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS")

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