A Random Act Of Kindness At A Minn. Dairy Queen

At a Dairy Queen in Hopkins, Minn., 19-year-old Joey Prusak — a store manager — was serving one of his customers, a regular who is visually impaired. The man dropped a $20 bill but didn't know it. Prusak was about to say something when a woman nearby picked it up and put it in her purse. What happened next went viral.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, a random act of kindness. It happened last week at a Dairy Queen in Hopkins, Minnesota. Nineteen-year-old Joey Prusak, a store manager, was serving one of his customers, a regular who is visually impaired. The man dropped a $20 bill but didn't know it. Prusak was about to say something when a woman nearby picked it up and put it in her purse. As she stepped to the counter, Prusak told the woman he wouldn't serve her until she returned the money. Here he is talking to a local CBS station.

JOEY PRUSAK: She goes, it's my money. And I go, all right. I'm going to ask you to leave the store politely right now. And then she made a big scene, started swearing. And then she stormed out.

CORNISH: Prusak then walked over to the man who had already taken a seat and begun eating.

PRUSAK: I told him, you dropped $20. I would like to give you $20 on behalf of myself and Dairy Queen to try and make things right.

CORNISH: The $20 came from Prusak's own pocket. A bystander who saw it all wrote an email of praise to the store's owner and the story went viral. Now, business at the Hopkins Dairy Queen is up with customers leaving big tips. And Prusak's getting plenty of phone calls, including an atta-boy from his big boss, billionaire Warren Buffett. His company owns Dairy Queen. Talk about a cherry on top.

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