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Bangladesh Garment Workers Protest Over Pay, Factories Shutdown

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Bangladesh Garment Workers Protest Over Pay, Factories Shutdown

Bangladesh Garment Workers Protest Over Pay, Factories Shutdown

Bangladesh Garment Workers Protest Over Pay, Factories Shutdown

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/225382225/225382224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Thousands of garment workers in Bangladesh continued protesting today. Dozens of people have been injured in clashes with police. Working conditions have come under the spotlight, because of tragedies like the collapse of a garment factory that killed more than a thousand people.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with protests in Bangladesh.

Thousands of garment workers in Bangladesh continue protesting today. Dozens have been injured in clashes with police. They're demanding higher wages, seeking about $100 - per month. The demonstrators have forced over 100 factories to closes; factories that supply retailer like Wal-Mart and Gap.

Bangladesh has become a global clothing manufacturing in part because of those low wages. But working conditions have come under the spotlight because of tragedies like one this spring, when a building housing several garment factories collapsed, killing more than 1,000 people.

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