Symphonies Show Their Brass In World Series Smackdown Video

Talking smack is practically a right of passage for baseball fans. As the St. Louis Cardinals face off against the Boston Red Sox in the World Series this week, members of the two cities' symphonies — the brass sections, to be exact — took their rivalry to YouTube with a video smackdown.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Finally, this hour, a little World Series smack talk courtesy of YouTube and the symphony.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Oh, look, Boston finally closed out Detroit. We were wondering how long that was going to take you.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Well, since we don't have to travel for game one, you know, because our all-stars are better than your all-stars, we weren't really in a hurry.

BLOCK: Those are no thugs trading insults about their teams. These are tough talking classical musicians with French horns and trombones.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Well, don't get impatient as we cruise towards our 12th championship. At this point, we don't even remember how to lose.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: You remembered how to lose in 2004. You remembered really well.

BLOCK: The Cardinals versus the Red Sox, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra versus Boston Symphony Orchestra and it's not just verbal barbs they're trading.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, 'TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME')

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

After talking smack about each other's teams, the two break into a kind of musical showdown.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, 'TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME')

CORNISH: Not really a showdown, more like a mashup of two orchestras' brass section playing a medley that includes iconic tributes to each of their own towns.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, 'TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME')

BLOCK: And don't worry, the symphonic showdown ends on a sweet note. The next message you see, here's to the best World Series yet. Go Cards, Go Sox. Your orchestras support you.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.