Marcia Wallace, Of 'Simpsons' And 'Newhart Show' Fame, Dies

Marcia Wallace has died at the age of 70. She was best known for her voice work as fourth-grade teacher Edna Krabappel on The Simpsons and as the wisecracking secretary on The Bob Newhart Show.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, we remember the voice and the laugh of Marcia Wallace.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SERIES, "THE SIMPOSONS")

MARCIA WALLACE: (as Edna Krabappel) Attention teachers: We're on strike. Ha.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

That's Wallace as Edna Krabappel. She played Bart Simpson's weary, fourth-grade teacher for more than two decades on "The Simpsons."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SERIES, "THE SIMPSONS")

WALLACE: (as Edna Krabappel) So today we all have to stay two extra hours to make up for the time we lost. Ha.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Aww.

CORNISH: Marcia Wallace died Friday at the age of 70.

SIEGEL: In addition to her voice work on "The Simpsons," fans may also recognize her face. She played wisecracking secretary Carol Kester on "The Bob Newhart Show."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SERIES, "THE BOB NEWHART SHOW")

BOB NEWHART: (as Bob Hartley) Carol, you are very, very important.

WALLACE: (as Carol Kester) Oh, Bob, I know that. I mean it's not everyone who can get straight through to Tony, you know. He was right in the middle of a dye job.

(LAUGHTER)

CORNISH: In 1992, Marcia Wallace won an Emmy for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for "The Simpsons" episode "Bart the Lover" where Edna Krabappel tries to find love.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SERIES, "THE SIMPSONS")

WALLACE: (as Edna Krabappel) A personal ad, why not? It might be fun, kind of a lark. Come on. Come on, answer the phone. I need a man.

(SOUNDBITE OF A BANG)

SIEGEL: On Saturday, "Simpsons" executive producer Al Jean said in a statement that the show plans to retire Wallace's irreplaceable character.

CORNISH: In honor of her long career in comedy, we'd like to give Marcia Wallace the last laugh.

WALLACE: You mean ha?

CORNISH: Yeah, just like that.

WALLACE: Ha.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIEGEL: You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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