'Penelope' Penelope (Christina Ricci) has a disfiguring family curse — a pig-like nose — that can only be broken by true love. The nose scares off most potential suitors, except Max (James McAvoy), and the plot may scare off most audiences over the age of eight.
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Arts & Life

'Penelope'

Penelope (Christina Ricci) is cursed with a snout-like nose that scares off potential suitors in Penelope. Summit Entertainment hide caption

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Summit Entertainment

Penelope (Christina Ricci) is cursed with a pig snout-like nose that scares off potential suiters, such as Max (James McAvoy) in Penelope.

Summit Entertainment
  • Director: Mark Palansky
  • Genre: Comedy
  • Running Time: 102 minutes

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Beauty may be only skin deep, but no one's looking any deeper in this elaborately cinematized but uninvolving fable about a pig-snouted young woman looking for love in a social circle that favors pert but less upturned noses.

Christina Ricci is Penelope, and her inoperable deformity isn't remotely severe enough to justify the farcical horror with which it's greeted by her parents, who lock her away from public view, and then by the young swains they recruit for her. All are sworn to secrecy before she's unveiled, at which point all run screaming from the family manse, some exiting by second-story windows in their haste to get away.

Only a handsome if dissolute lout named Max (James MacAvoy) can see past her proboscis. Alas, he's too proud to marry Penelope for her fortune, even though he's gambled away his own. Will she overcome her shyness? Will he overcome his principles? Will they marry and have porcine-visaged children?

Will any audience member over the age of 7 be remotely interested in the answers?