Looking Back at the Black Panther Movement

A father and son attend a rally to free Panther leader Huey P. Newton, 1968.

A father and son attend a rally to free Panther leader Huey P. Newton, 1968. Ruth Marion Baruch and Pirkle Jones/Courtesy 18th Street Arts Center hide caption

itoggle caption Ruth Marion Baruch and Pirkle Jones/Courtesy 18th Street Arts Center
A father and son attend a rally to free Panther leader Huey P. Newton, 1968.

A father and son attend a rally to free Panther leader Huey P. Newton, 1968. Ruth Marion Baruch and Pirkle Jones/Courtesy 18th Street Arts Center hide caption

itoggle caption Ruth Marion Baruch and Pirkle Jones/Courtesy 18th Street Arts Center

In the 1960s, the Black Panther Party formed based on the idea of armed self-defense. At the time, FBI officials and media reports portrayed the Panthers as dangerous militants. Now, a new Santa Monica, Calif., exhibit of photographs from the 1960s examines the Panthers' image then and now. Senior editor Phillip Martin reports.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.