Herbally Derived Drug Combats Resistant Malaria

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Malaria is transmitted by female mosquitoes of this genus, Anopheles gambiae.

Malaria is transmitted by female mosquitoes of this genus, Anopheles gambiae. Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Corbis

Inexpensive malaria drugs are becoming useless due to widespread resistance in malaria parasites. A relatively new drug called Artemisinin, developed from an herbal medicine used in China for years, has proved effective in Asia, but its relatively high cost puts it out of reach for many people in areas where malaria is endemic. A new report by the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies recommends the broadest possible access to Artemisinin-based combination therapies around the world. NPR's Joanne Silberner reports.

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