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Geoduck Clam Farms Spread along Coastal Northwest

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Geoduck Clam Farms Spread along Coastal Northwest

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Geoduck Clam Farms Spread along Coastal Northwest

Geoduck Clam Farms Spread along Coastal Northwest

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3607092/3607093" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mike Booth works to harvest the geoduck clams from as deep as three feet. Zach Manzella hide caption

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Zach Manzella

Geoduck farmer Jim Gibbons at a field. Zach Manzella hide caption

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Zach Manzella

Geoduck farms are spreading around the coastal Northwest. The geoduck, the largest clam in North America (and pronounced GOO-ee-duck), is a bivalve with a three-foot neck. They can live to be more than 150 years old.

For years, divers have harvested the delicacies from the salt waters of Washington, Alaska and British Columbia. Now — like oysters and other shellfish — they're being farmed by entrepreneurs.

After a visit to a farming operation, Austin Jenkins from Olympia, Wash., reports.

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