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Candidates on the Issues: Iraq

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Candidates on the Issues: Iraq

Candidates on the Issues: Iraq

Candidates on the Issues: Iraq

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3610895/3611795" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A U.S. Marine stands guard atop a military vehicle near Falluja, May 1, 2004. © Oleg Popov/Reuters/Corbis hide caption

» HEAR THE CANDIDATES ON IRAQ, OTHER ISSUES
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© Oleg Popov/Reuters/Corbis

A U.S. Marine stands guard atop a military vehicle near Falluja, May 1, 2004 Oleg Popov/Reuters/Corbis hide caption

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Oleg Popov/Reuters/Corbis

The war in Iraq has polarized voters like no other issue in this presidential election year. With U.S. fatalities continuing to rise, the volatile situation in Iraq is likely to make the election outcome as unpredictable as any in history. NPR's Don Gonyea reports.

President Bush continues to defend his decision to invade Iraq, saying America is safer for having ousted Saddam Hussein. Meanwhile, Sen. John Kerry, his Democratic opponent, is trying to capitalize on polls showing a majority of Americans now believe the decision to go to war was a mistake. But it's not clear how Kerry's approach to rebuilding Iraq would differ from Bush's if he wins in November.