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The Hot Air That Helped Fuel the Space Race

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The Hot Air That Helped Fuel the Space Race

Space

The Hot Air That Helped Fuel the Space Race

The Hot Air That Helped Fuel the Space Race

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3621107/3621108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dr. Jean Piccard and his wife undertake one of the earliest flights into the stratosphere. Oct. 23, 1934. Corbis hide caption

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Corbis

Dr. Jean Piccard and his wife undertake one of the earliest flights into the stratosphere. Oct. 23, 1934. hide caption

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At sunrise Wednesday, a hot air balloon will rise from South Dakota's Black Hills to commemorate the world's first research flight into the stratosphere. The 1934 "Explorer One" mission paved the way for future missions that laid the foundations of the space program. Jim Kent reports.