The Hot Air That Helped Fuel the Space Race

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Dr. Jean Piccard and his wife undertake one of the earliest flights into the stratosphere. Oct. 23,

Dr. Jean Piccard and his wife undertake one of the earliest flights into the stratosphere. Oct. 23, 1934. Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Corbis
Dr. Jean Piccard and his wife undertake one of the earliest flights into the stratosphere. Oct. 23,

Dr. Jean Piccard and his wife undertake one of the earliest flights into the stratosphere. Oct. 23, 1934. hide caption

itoggle caption

At sunrise Wednesday, a hot air balloon will rise from South Dakota's Black Hills to commemorate the world's first research flight into the stratosphere. The 1934 "Explorer One" mission paved the way for future missions that laid the foundations of the space program. Jim Kent reports.

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