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Snakeheads Strengthening Hold on U.S. Waters

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Snakeheads Strengthening Hold on U.S. Waters

Environment

Snakeheads Strengthening Hold on U.S. Waters

Snakeheads Strengthening Hold on U.S. Waters

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3812311/3812646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The aggressive snakehead fish has become a threat in parts of the United States, where it is pushing local fish out of their habitat. Corbis hide caption

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Corbis

The aggressive snakehead fish -- which has a voracious appetite and can live out of water for days -- has become a threat in parts of the United States. Corbis hide caption

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Corbis

Authorities say they face tough odds in trying to stop the spread of the northern snakehead, a sharp-toothed, destructive fish from Asia that's turned up in the Potomac River — apparently dumped there. Officials say the aggressive, invasive species will wound ecosystems and hurt the local fishing economy. NPR's John Nielsen reports.