NPR at Aspen: The Shahams

A Family Affair Onstage at the Festival

Audio for this story from Performance Today is not available.

Listen: Hear the Shahams and Violinist Adele Anthony

The Shahams and conductor David Zinman

Gil and Orli Shaham and conductor David Zinman. Alex Irvin, Aspen Music Festival and School hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Irvin, Aspen Music Festival and School

NPR's Fred Child is in Aspen, on stage with the Shaham family — pianist Orli Shaham, her brother, violinist Gil Shaham, and Gil's wife, violinist Adele Anthony.

Adele Anthony and the Shahams in Rehearsal

Adele Anthony, Orli Shaham and Gil Shaham in rehearsal with conductor David Zinman turning pages at the piano. Alex Irvin, Aspen Music Festival and School hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Irvin, Aspen Music Festival and School

First Orli and Adele — who have known each other since they were both pre-teen talents at Aspen — play the first movement of the Mozart Violin Sonata in F Major, K. 374e.

Gil Shaham then joins his wife and sister to perform. The three musicians had only recently played together as a trio due to the scarcity of pieces written for two violins and piano. They play one of the best: the Suite for 2 violins and Piano, op. 71, by Polish composer Moritz Moszkowski (1854-1925).

Gil Shaham and Adele Anthony both play Stradivarius violins — Gil's made in 1699 and Adele's in 1728. Fred asks Gil about an interesting contraption he uses inside his instrument: a Dampit.

During the summer festival season, especially in particularly dry locations like Aspen, performers find that the Dampit — costing all of $.99 — is crucial to keeping their multi-million dollar instruments humidified.

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