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U.S. Surveillance Aids Environmental Study

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U.S. Surveillance Aids Environmental Study

Environment

U.S. Surveillance Aids Environmental Study

U.S. Surveillance Aids Environmental Study

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3864669/3864670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A California forest fire in 2002, seen roughly 438 miles above the Earth by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). NASA hide caption

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View of a 2002 fire from roughly 438 miles above the Earth. NASA hide caption

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It's not surprising that the Bush administration is backing a plan to increase communication between satellite surveillance agencies. What is surprising is that the shared information could possibly help improve the global environment.

NPR's John Nielsen reports on the White House-approved efforts of many groups, including NASA, to monitor and track patterns in the environment.

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