Sugar Foes Want Food Pyramid Revised Scientific advisors to the federal government will soon release recommendations for changes in dietary guidelines that would encourage Americans to reduce the intake of sugar, salt and trans-fatty acids, and increase their consumption of foods like fish. But the final guidelines may not reflect the scientific evidence if soft drink manufacturers and the sugar lobby get their way. NPR's Richard Knox reports.
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Sugar Foes Want Food Pyramid Revised

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Sugar Foes Want Food Pyramid Revised

Sugar Foes Want Food Pyramid Revised

Sugar Foes Want Food Pyramid Revised

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3873020/3873021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As the federal government prepares to release new dietary guidelines for Americans, health advocates urge a sharp reduction in sugar intake. An advisory panel will release 34 recommendations Friday, with the goal of reducing intakes of sugar, salt and trans-fatty acids.

But food industry lobbyists are likely to fight those moves before the final guidelines come out in early 2005. NPR's Richard Knox reports.