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Powell's Standing in Bush Administration

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Powell's Standing in Bush Administration

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Powell's Standing in Bush Administration

Powell's Standing in Bush Administration

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3886493/3886494" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Secretary of State Colin Powell is revered at his own agency, for his dedication to Foreign Service officers and his role as a voice of moderation. But critics say he has been boxed out of major foreign policy decisions in this Administration. The defining moment of his tenure might well be his speech to the U.N. Security Council in early 2003. He tried to make the case that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, but the speech was based on flawed intelligence. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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