The Machinery of Democracy, a History of Balloting

An automatic voting machine model last used in the 1944 presidential election between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Thomas E. Dewey. Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian hide caption

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itoggle caption Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian
An automatic voting machine model last used in the 1944 presidential election.

An automatic voting machine model last used in the 1944 presidential election between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Thomas E. Dewey. Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian hide caption

itoggle caption Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian

Most Americans never paid that much attention to how they voted until the 2000 presidential elections showed that even tiny punch card chads can make a difference. Now, a lot of voting equipment — especially new electronic touch screen machines — gets intense scrutiny. But a new exhibit at the Smithsonian shows that worries about voting security are as old as the republic.

NPR's Pam Fessler has a report on the National Museum of American History exhibit, which is called "Vote: The Machinery of Democracy."

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