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The Machinery of Democracy, a History of Balloting

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The Machinery of Democracy, a History of Balloting

The Machinery of Democracy, a History of Balloting

The Machinery of Democracy, a History of Balloting

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3918074/3918700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An automatic voting machine model last used in the 1944 presidential election between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Thomas E. Dewey. Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian hide caption

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Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian

An automatic voting machine model last used in the 1944 presidential election between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Thomas E. Dewey. Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian hide caption

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Hugh Talman/The Smithsonian

Most Americans never paid that much attention to how they voted until the 2000 presidential elections showed that even tiny punch card chads can make a difference. Now, a lot of voting equipment — especially new electronic touch screen machines — gets intense scrutiny. But a new exhibit at the Smithsonian shows that worries about voting security are as old as the republic.

NPR's Pam Fessler has a report on the National Museum of American History exhibit, which is called "Vote: The Machinery of Democracy."