Tobacco Lawsuit

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/3931141/3931142" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript

Government lawyers seek $280 billion from big tobacco, and they're using a powerful law in the case. The RICO law was written to chase mobsters — now it's behind the biggest racketeering case in history. We discuss the case and how the tobacco industry is changing.

Guests:

Debbie Elliott, NPR reporter who's been following this story and the tobacco industry for years

William Schultz, deputy assistant attorney general of Civil Division under President Clinton. Supervisor and developer of the case. Lawyer for Zuckerman-Spader, a private Washington law firm.

Mike Pheil, VP of communications for Altria

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.