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Tobacco Lawsuit

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Tobacco Lawsuit

Tobacco Lawsuit

Tobacco Lawsuit

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3931141/3931142" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Government lawyers seek $280 billion from big tobacco, and they're using a powerful law in the case. The RICO law was written to chase mobsters — now it's behind the biggest racketeering case in history. We discuss the case and how the tobacco industry is changing.

Guests:

Debbie Elliott, NPR reporter who's been following this story and the tobacco industry for years

William Schultz, deputy assistant attorney general of Civil Division under President Clinton. Supervisor and developer of the case. Lawyer for Zuckerman-Spader, a private Washington law firm.

Mike Pheil, VP of communications for Altria