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Apple Computer Sued by Beatle Company

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Apple Computer Sued by Beatle Company

Digital Life

Apple Computer Sued by Beatle Company

Apple Computer Sued by Beatle Company

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3931329/3931330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Apple CEO Steve Jobs with the first-generation iPod, introduced in 2001. Corbis hide caption

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Corbis

Apple Corps, the still-active company that handles the finances of the former Beatles and their estates, is again suing Apple Computer. The suit is over the computer company's use of Apple as a trademark in the distribution of music, via iTunes and iPods.

In 1981, the two companies agreed to share the name. Apple Corps first sued in 1991, after the computer company introduced MIDI, which allows computers and synthesizers to work together to compose and record music. Apple Computers settled for $26.5 million. A judge recently ruled that the case would be tried in England. There are rumors that another settlement may be in the works, and a possible deal to make the Beatles' music available online legally for the first time. Joel Rose, of member station WHYY, reports.