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U.S. Scientists Win Nobel for Smell Research

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U.S. Scientists Win Nobel for Smell Research

Science

U.S. Scientists Win Nobel for Smell Research

U.S. Scientists Win Nobel for Smell Research

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4060317/4060748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Odorant receptors and the organization of the olfactory system. The Nobel Foundation hide caption

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toggle caption The Nobel Foundation

Richard Axel (left) and Linda Buck Fred Hutchinson hide caption

toggle caption Fred Hutchinson

American scientists Richard Axel and Linda Buck have been awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on the sense of smell. Published in 1991, their research solved the mystery of how the brain is able to recognize and distinguish between 10,000 different odors. Buck, who works at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle, and Axel, a Howard Hughes scholar at Columbia University, will split the $1.4 million award. NPR's Richard Knox reports.

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