U.S. Quark Work Nets Nobel The 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded to three Americans for their insights into the fundamental structures of matter -- the forces that bind together quarks. David Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek showed how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain how a coin spins -- and how the universe was built.
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Three Americans Share Nobel Physics Prize

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Three Americans Share Nobel Physics Prize

Three Americans Share Nobel Physics Prize

Three Americans Share Nobel Physics Prize

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4062554/4062841" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

David Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek showed how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. Corbis hide caption

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The 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded to three Americans for their insights into the fundamental structures of matter — the forces that bind quarks together. David Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek's 1973 discovery showed how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built.

In awarding the prize, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the scientists' work brought physics closer to its dream of "a theory for everything." NPR's David Kestenbaum reports.