Exploring America's 'National Identity' Nearly two-thirds of Americans say our culture and values change as new people arrive. But two-thirds of non-immigrants say America should have a single culture. Is America a melting pot, a salad bowl -- or, as one Harvard professor puts it, tomato soup?
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Exploring America's 'National Identity'

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Exploring America's 'National Identity'

Exploring America's 'National Identity'

Exploring America's 'National Identity'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4074849/4074850" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Pakistani and Egyptian immigrants pledge allegiance to the United States during a citizenship swearing-in ceremony, Aug. 2004. Corbis hide caption

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Only about one-third of Americans say the country has a basic culture and values that immigrants take on. Nearly twice as many say our culture and values change as new people arrive. But two-thirds of non-immigrants say America should have a single culture. Is America a melting pot, a salad bowl — or, as one Harvard professor puts it, tomato soup? NPR's John Ydstie reports.

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