The Future of Satellite Radio From music formats you've never heard of to personalities you have, the selection seems endless. Jazz, rock, pop, and talk, all with crystal-clear reception. We discuss satellite radio -- how good is it now, and where is it headed?
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The Future of Satellite Radio

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The Future of Satellite Radio

The Future of Satellite Radio

The Future of Satellite Radio

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4107306/4107307" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

From music formats you've never heard of to personalities you have, the selection seems endless. Jazz, rock, pop, and talk, all with crystal-clear reception. We discuss satellite radio — how good is it now, and where is it headed?

Guests:

Gregg "Opie" Hughes and Anthony Cumia, hosts of the Opie & Anthony show, which airs on XM satellite radio

Richard Martin, contributing editor, Wiredmagazine

Rep. Gene Green, Democratic representative of 29th District of Texas. Sponsored a bill that calls for FCC to look at satellite radio's use of local news and traffic. Member of House Energy and Commerce Committee.

John Crigler, communications attorney for the firm Garvey, Schubert and Barer