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Iraq's Arab Neighbors: Anti-Americanism Runs High

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Iraq's Arab Neighbors: Anti-Americanism Runs High

Iraq's Arab Neighbors: Anti-Americanism Runs High

Iraq's Arab Neighbors: Anti-Americanism Runs High

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4122652/4123079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Shibley Telhami, a Middle East specialist at the University of Maryland, says polls in Arab countries show a rising resentment of America. Many Arabs think the United States wants to "weaken Muslims," he says. Univ. of Maryland hide caption

toggle caption Univ. of Maryland

Most Arabs opposed the U.S.-led war in Iraq. Yet many in the Arab world were happy to see Saddam Hussein's regime toppled, hoping it signaled the end of autocratic rule in the region.

Eighteen months later, opinions in the region are dramatically different. Anti-American anger in the Arab world is at an all-time high, shaped mainly by the Iraq war, and a perception that U.S. foreign policy is hostile to Arab and Muslim concerns.

In the conclusion of a series on Iraq's Arab neighbors, NPR's Deborah Amos reports on findings of recent opinion polls conducted in the region.

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