NPR logo

Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4131762/4136229" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4131762/4136229" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In Manhattan, a lost world is taking shape in a huge workshop at the American Museum of Natural History. Exhibitors say it will be the most up-to-date dinosaur show ever.

Writers, artists and scientists are working together to bring to life a painstakingly realistic recreation of the plants, insects and, of course, dinosaurs that roamed the earth during the Mesozoic Era.

As part of a Morning Edition series on the intersection of art and science, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports.

Reviving Dilong paradoxus: a wire-frame model, covered with gray epoxy moulding, of a 130-million-year old member of the tyrannosaur family. Gisele Grayson, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Gisele Grayson, NPR

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.