Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life At the American Museum of Natural History, a lost world is taking shape. Artists, writers and scientists have joined forces to create the most up-to-date dinosaur show ever. NPR's Christopher Joyce reports.
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Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

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Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

Bringing the Lost World of Dinosaurs to Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4131762/4136229" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In Manhattan, a lost world is taking shape in a huge workshop at the American Museum of Natural History. Exhibitors say it will be the most up-to-date dinosaur show ever.

Writers, artists and scientists are working together to bring to life a painstakingly realistic recreation of the plants, insects and, of course, dinosaurs that roamed the earth during the Mesozoic Era.

As part of a Morning Edition series on the intersection of art and science, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports.

Reviving Dilong paradoxus: a wire-frame model, covered with gray epoxy moulding, of a 130-million-year old member of the tyrannosaur family. Gisele Grayson, NPR hide caption

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Gisele Grayson, NPR