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Art Detectives Recover Lost Masterpieces

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Art Detectives Recover Lost Masterpieces

Art & Design

Art Detectives Recover Lost Masterpieces

Art Detectives Recover Lost Masterpieces

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4167800/4197114" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Cezanne's 'Bouilloire et Fruits' i

Cezanne's "Bouilloire et Fruits" (Pewter pitcher and fruit), dating from 1888-1890, is among the first works where Cubism can be identified. Stolen in 1978, it was recovered in 1999 by Art Loss Register. It sold at auction for about $25 million. Courtesy Art Loss Register hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Art Loss Register
Cezanne's 'Bouilloire et Fruits'

Cezanne's "Bouilloire et Fruits" (Pewter pitcher and fruit), dating from 1888-1890, is among the first works where Cubism can be identified. Stolen in 1978, it was recovered in 1999 by Art Loss Register. It sold at auction for about $25 million.

Courtesy Art Loss Register
Édouard Manet's 'Peaches' (1880)

Édouard Manet's "Peaches" (1880) was stolen in 1977. ALR recovered it in 1997 after being contacted by a Florida art dealer who was offered the painting for sale. hide caption

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On a quiet Sunday afternoon this summer, armed robbers stormed into a museum in Norway and took two paintings, one of which was Edvard Munch's expressionistic masterpiece "The Scream." As soon as the theft was reported, the painting was entered into what's called the Art Loss Register.

A small for-profit company with offices in New York, Art Loss Register has compiled an enormous database to help track lost or stolen art. Over the years the company has had some notable success locating missing works — including masterpieces by Cezanne and Manet. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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