Grand Canyon to Receive Massive Water Influx Scientists with the Department of the Interior will open four tubes on the Colorado River and temporarily flood the Grand Canyon. Researchers hope to stir up enough sediment to help reverse erosion in the canyon. NPR's Liane Hansen speaks to Jeff Lovich, chief of the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, about the experiment.
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Grand Canyon to Receive Massive Water Influx

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Grand Canyon to Receive Massive Water Influx

Grand Canyon to Receive Massive Water Influx

Grand Canyon to Receive Massive Water Influx

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4180873/4180874" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Scientists with the Department of the Interior will open four tubes on the Colorado River and temporarily flood the Grand Canyon. Researchers hope to stir up enough sediment to help reverse erosion in the canyon. NPR's Liane Hansen speaks to Jeff Lovich, chief of the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, about the experiment.