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Fallujah Invasion Can Offer Lessons for the Future
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Fallujah Invasion Can Offer Lessons for the Future

Iraq

Fallujah Invasion Can Offer Lessons for the Future

Fallujah Invasion Can Offer Lessons for the Future
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After an unsuccessful attempt to take Fallujah in April, U.S. Marines surrounded the insurgent stronghold in advance of their successful attack at the beginning of November. U.S.-led forces now control the city. NPR's Michele Norris talks with Maj. Gen. Robert Scales, who discusses what the assault demonstrates about urban warfare.

Learning Lessons in a Prolonged War

Learning Lessons in a Prolonged War
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Earl J. Catagnus Jr.

Marine Staff Sgt. Earl J. Catagnus Jr. helped remove insurgents from Fallujah neighborhoods in 2004. Courtesy Earl Catagnus hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Earl Catagnus

Military rules of engagement are being closely examined in the wake of accusations that U.S. Marines killed 24 unarmed civilians in the Iraqi town of Haditha.

In the latest in a series of conversations on leadership in a lengthening war, we hear from an enlisted man who wrote about his experiences in Iraq — and helped change the way Marines are taught to go into urban combat.

Staff Sgt. Earl J. Catagnus Jr. was the leader of a group of snipers who worked to remove insurgents from houses during the battle of Fallujah in November 2004.

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