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Battlefield Medicine: Living Through War

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Battlefield Medicine: Living Through War

The Impact of War

Battlefield Medicine: Living Through War

Battlefield Medicine: Living Through War

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4227577/4227578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Typical operating room set up in a tent. hide caption

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Transport team picks up a wounded soldier for treatment. hide caption

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Modern medicine and transportation mean U.S. troops wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq can survive wounds that might have killed them in previous wars. But that also means many more survivors who have devastating injuries.

Guests:

Atul Gawande, professor, Harvard School of Public Health; authored recent report on battlefield medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine

Lt. Col. George Peoples, chief of surgical oncology at Walter Reed Hospital; stationed in a surgical unit in Iraq from January to August 2003

Col. Paul Cordts, director of Health Policy and Services at the Office of the Army Surgeon General

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