An Offshore Dilemma: Algae-Battling Tarps Now Habitats NPR's Madeleine Brand talks to NPR's Ira Flatow, host of Talk of the Nation Science Friday, about how giant underwater tarps filled with chlorine are being used to battle destructive algae in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California. The tarps were supposed to be temporary, but now some scientists worry that their removal could endanger the sea life that's turned the tarps into their habitat.
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An Offshore Dilemma: Algae-Battling Tarps Now Habitats

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An Offshore Dilemma: Algae-Battling Tarps Now Habitats

An Offshore Dilemma: Algae-Battling Tarps Now Habitats

An Offshore Dilemma: Algae-Battling Tarps Now Habitats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4231333/4231334" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Madeleine Brand talks to NPR's Ira Flatow, host of Talk of the Nation Science Friday, about how giant underwater tarps filled with chlorine are being used to battle destructive algae in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California. The tarps were supposed to be temporary, but now some scientists worry that their removal could endanger the sea life that's turned the tarps into their habitat.

The enemy: A bed of Caulerpa taxifolia -- commonly found in many salt-water fish tanks -- takes root on the ocean floor, crowding out native species. Rachel Woodfield/Merkel & Associates hide caption

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Rachel Woodfield/Merkel & Associates