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Bringing U.S. Wounded Home from the Battlefield

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Bringing U.S. Wounded Home from the Battlefield

The Impact of War

Bringing U.S. Wounded Home from the Battlefield

Bringing U.S. Wounded Home from the Battlefield

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Advances in battlefield medicine mean more and more U.S. soldiers survive severe injuries and make it home again. That's where they face the daunting challenge of recovery and a possible life with disability. In the second of our two-part discussion of the wounds of war, we report on soldiers adapting to life after being wounded overseas.

Guests:

Nancy Shute, senior writer, US News and World Report; wrote on the medical treatment of soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan

David Coleman, Marine Lance Cpl. wounded in Iraq in September, awaiting surgery

Dr. Roy Aaron, professor of orthopedic surgery, Brown Medical School, Providence, R.I.; heading a research project on restoring arm and leg functions to amputees