Adoption from the Birth Mother's Perspective

Evelyn, who asked that we not use her last name, holds her baby boy, born Dec. 22.

Evelyn, who asked that we not use her last name, holds her baby boy, born in December. hide caption

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Birth parents tend to have more power — and more choices — in the adoption process than ever before. They can choose which family raises the baby and how much contact, if any, they'll have as the child grows up. NPR's Tovia Smith spends time with one 16-year-old birth mother planning to place her child for adoption.

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Adoption Resources

The American Academy of Adoption Attorneys is a national association of attorneys who practice in the field of adoption law. The academy's work includes promoting the reform of adoption laws and disseminating information on ethical adoption practices.

The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute, founded in 1996, is a national not-for-profit organization devoted to improving adoption policy and practice.

ODS Adoption Community of New England, Inc. was incorporated as a non-profit membership organization in 1967. Known for 34 years as Open Door Society of Massachusetts, Inc., its goals and services have expanded to include all those touched by adoption.

The National Adoption Information Clearinghouse provides comprehensive information on domestic and intercountry adoption, with information for all members of the triad.

American Adoption Congress provides a national voice for issues in adoption, particularly for birth parent and adoptee rights.

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