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Weighing the Tsunami's Environmental Impact

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Weighing the Tsunami's Environmental Impact

Environment

Weighing the Tsunami's Environmental Impact

Weighing the Tsunami's Environmental Impact

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4273776/4273777" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As the people of Southeast Asia struggle to recover from the Asian tsunami, we take a look at the environmental and ecological impacts of all that seawater. Plus, anecdotal reports suggest that most large mammals in the area escaped harm. We talk with a scientist about whether animals can sense an oncoming tsunami.

Don Melnick, executive director of the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC); Thomas Hunt Morgan Professor of Conservation Biology in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology at Columbia University.

Ellen Pikitch, professor at the University of Miami; executive director of the Pew Institute for Ocean Science.

Eric Falt, director of the Division of Communications and Public Information, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); director of the United Nations Information Centre in Nairobi, Kenya.