Uncovering Germany's High-Speed Train Legacy NPR's Emily Harris reports on the futuristic design of a long-lost German passenger train that traveled between Hamburg and Berlin, driven by a pusher propeller. The train didn't catch on, but the German railway system matched its record speed only last month with its latest generation of passenger trains.
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Uncovering Germany's High-Speed Train Legacy

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Uncovering Germany's High-Speed Train Legacy

Uncovering Germany's High-Speed Train Legacy

Uncovering Germany's High-Speed Train Legacy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4458537/4458538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

During its test runs in 1931, the Schiene Zeppelin zipped along at 130 mph and made the Berlin-to-Hamburg run in about an Hour and a half. Deutsche Bahn Museum hide caption

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Deutsche Bahn Museum

During its test runs in 1931, the Schiene Zeppelin zipped along at 130 mph and made the Berlin-to-Hamburg run in about an Hour and a half.

Deutsche Bahn Museum

NPR's Emily Harris reports on the futuristic design of a long-lost German passenger train that traveled between Hamburg and Berlin, driven by a pusher propeller. The train didn't catch on, but the German railway system matched its record speed only last month with its latest generation of passenger trains.