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Hidden Treasures: Vice Presidential Artifacts

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Hidden Treasures: Vice Presidential Artifacts

Hidden Treasures: Vice Presidential Artifacts

Hidden Treasures: Vice Presidential Artifacts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4458752/4458968" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Nixon gave this photo of himself to his VP. Nixon appears to misspell Spiro Agnew's first name in the inscribed note: "To Vice President Spyro Agnew with deep appreciation for his service to the nation, from his friend Richard Nixon." Papers of Spiro T. Agnew, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries hide caption

toggle caption Papers of Spiro T. Agnew, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

President Nixon gave this photo of himself to his VP. Nixon appears to misspell Spiro Agnew's first name in the inscribed note: "To Vice President Spyro Agnew with deep appreciation for his service to the nation, from his friend Richard Nixon."

Papers of Spiro T. Agnew, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

When John Adams became the country's first vice president, he called the job "the most insignificant office that ever the invention of man contrived or his imagination conceived." The job profile has changed over the years, but most people still don't know what the vice president does.

Harriet Baskas visits a museum dedicated to one of nation's hidden treasures: the vice president.

John Nance Garner Trivia

John Nance Garner, who once said the vice-presidency was not worth a pitcher of warm spit, was President Franklin Roosevelt's first VP.

This story is part of the Hidden Treasures Radio Project, funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Cultural Development Authority of King County, Wash.

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