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The 'Spiral Jetty' Re-Emerges from Great Salt Lake

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The 'Spiral Jetty' Re-Emerges from Great Salt Lake

Art & Design

The 'Spiral Jetty' Re-Emerges from Great Salt Lake

The 'Spiral Jetty' Re-Emerges from Great Salt Lake

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4464074/4464075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Aerial view of "Spiral Jetty" at Rozel Point, a 1,500-foot long, 15-foot wide jetty created with mud and rocks. George Steinmetz/DIA Center for the Arts hide caption

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George Steinmetz/DIA Center for the Arts

Aerial view of "Spiral Jetty" at Rozel Point, a 1,500-foot long, 15-foot wide jetty created with mud and rocks.

George Steinmetz/DIA Center for the Arts

Reporter James Nelson tells the story of Robert Smithson's "Spiral Jetty," a 30-year-old piece of so-called "earth art" that has re-emerged from the bed of Utah's Great Salt Lake.

The jetty disappeared under the rising lake waters soon after it was created — but with much of the western United States experiencing a drought, the Great Salt Lake has receded and the art is once again above water.