'We Are Dad': Fighting a Gay Adoption Ban

Steven Lofton and Roger Croteau with their five foster children. i i

Steven Lofton and Roger Croteau with their five foster children. Tomas Rodriguez Gaspar hide caption

itoggle caption Tomas Rodriguez Gaspar
Steven Lofton and Roger Croteau with their five foster children.

Steven Lofton and Roger Croteau with their five foster children.

Tomas Rodriguez Gaspar
'We Are Dad' Director Michel Horvat

'We Are Dad' Director Michel Horvat hide caption

itoggle caption

Earlier this month, the United States Supreme Court refused to hear the case of Lofton v. State of Florida, challenging Florida's ban on adoption by gay couples. Florida is the only state with a blanket law prohibiting homosexuals from adopting children.

The appeal was brought by four gay foster parents who claimed Florida's law keeps thousands of orphaned and abandoned children from finding homes. Those four gay foster parents desperately want to adopt children in their care.

The new documentary We Are Dad follows one of the families involved in the Supreme Court case: Partners Steven Lofton and Roger Croteau, who now raise their five foster children in Oregon.

We Are Dad director Michel Horvat talks with reporter Cheryl Devall about the challenges of filming of his documentary — and the ordinary, day-to-day miracles that keep the family moving ahead. Four of the children are HIV positive, three are black and the two white children were born into an Oregon backwater cult.

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