U.S. Aircraft Seen as Vulnerable to Missile Attack A study by the RAND Corporation finds that al Qaeda and its affiliates have both the motive and means to attack U.S. commercial aircraft with shoulder-fired missiles. But should airlines equip their planes with anti-missile defenses? Robert Siegel talks with New York Times reporter Matthew Wald about the study's conclusion.
NPR logo

U.S. Aircraft Seen as Vulnerable to Missile Attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4465917/4465918" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
U.S. Aircraft Seen as Vulnerable to Missile Attack

U.S. Aircraft Seen as Vulnerable to Missile Attack

U.S. Aircraft Seen as Vulnerable to Missile Attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4465917/4465918" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A study by the RAND Corporation finds that al Qaeda and its affiliates have both the motive and means to attack U.S. commercial aircraft with shoulder-fired missiles. But should airlines equip their planes with anti-missile defenses? Robert Siegel talks with New York Times reporter Matthew Wald about the study's conclusion.