Women in Science The president of Harvard said this month that biology might explain why fewer women succeed in math and science careers. What's the situation like for women seeking careers in science, and what obstacles are they up against? Can the "leaky pipeline" for women in science be fixed? Plus, are there differences in the male and female brain?
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Women in Science

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Women in Science

Women in Science

Women in Science

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4470273/4470274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The president of Harvard said this month that biology might explain why fewer women succeed in math and science careers. What's the situation like for women seeking careers in science, and what obstacles are they up against? Can the "leaky pipeline" for women in science be fixed? Plus, are there differences in the male and female brain?

Guests:

Nancy Hopkins, Amgen, Inc. professor of biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Marianne Bronner-Fraser, Albert Billings Ruddock Professor of Biology, California Institute of Technology

Meg Urry, professor of physics. Director of the Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics