Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold Customer calls pose a dillema for many companies, as they try to bridge the gap between efficient automation and personalized service. According to the Incoming Calls Management Institute, average call waiting time is over two minutes. That's a 33 percent increase over five years ago.
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Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

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Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4492440/4492443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Customer calls pose a dillema for many companies, as they try to bridge the gap between efficient automation and personalized service. But that doesn't necessarily mean more satisfied customers. Pushing a lot of buttons to reach a human being doesn't usually build good will. And according to the Incoming Calls Management Institute, average call waiting time is over two minutes. That's a 33 percent increase over five years ago.

Guest:

Ernie Sander, news editor, The Wall Street Journal