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Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

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Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

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Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

Call Centers and the Time We Spend on Hold

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4492440/4492443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Customer calls pose a dillema for many companies, as they try to bridge the gap between efficient automation and personalized service. But that doesn't necessarily mean more satisfied customers. Pushing a lot of buttons to reach a human being doesn't usually build good will. And according to the Incoming Calls Management Institute, average call waiting time is over two minutes. That's a 33 percent increase over five years ago.

Guest:

Ernie Sander, news editor, The Wall Street Journal